The Networking Woman

The Governing Woman

The Healing Woman

The Guiding Woman

The Business Woman

The Mining Woman

The Harvesting Woman

Akhona Sass, 36

Akhona Sass, 36

"Akhona Sass hopes that one day we can get rid of terms such as “the IT guy”, and has steadily been working to subvert the dominance of men in the IT industry by employing more young women at her company, Intotek. Sass became director and owner of the technology and...

Zaakira Mahomed, 48

Zaakira Mahomed, 48

“We wanted to decrease absenteeism and pregnancy rates to keep girls in school. They shouldn’t be missing out on an education because they cannot afford something like a sanitary product, which is a basic human right.”

Thobeka Ndlovu, 30

Thobeka Ndlovu, 30

“I lost my brother in the process of him trying to find a job in this country. Now I strive to give back to my community, in remembrance of him, so no one finds themselves in the same situation.”

Tracy Brander, 51

Tracy Brander, 51

Tracy Brander is not afraid of getting her hands dirty. In fact, she would rather be in the field than in the boardroom, drilling for water in an effort to bring safe drinking water and sanitation to all who need it.

Tshepo Mathabatha, 38

Tshepo Mathabatha, 38

“Let’s stop fighting to have a seat at the table with the boys. Let’s build our own table.”

Zubeida Jaffer, 63

Zubeida Jaffer, 63

“Practise, practise, practise your craft – if you don’t, you’ll be mediocre.”

Vuyokazi Nkevu Langbooi, 38

Vuyokazi Nkevu Langbooi, 38

“I was taught to treat people with respect and dignity. If I have to sit where you are sitting, eat what you are eating, or even bathe you in order for me to build trust and help you, I do that.”

Zinaschke Steyn, 33

Zinaschke Steyn, 33

“It’s important to start from the bottom and not be scared to get your hands dirty.”

Nonkululeko Mtshali, 34

Nonkululeko Mtshali, 34

“Vintage Girls is not just an organisation, it is a calling that will grow with me until I die. I live for Vintage Girls; it is my life.”

Sebabatso Tsaoane, 27

Sebabatso Tsaoane, 27

“I do hope I get to see a time when women in my field are more respected and receive more recognition. Nurses and midwives put their lives on the line to protect and heal those in their care, sometimes under extremely unfavourable circumstances.”

Refilwe Ledwaba, 41

Refilwe Ledwaba, 41

“In my 20 years in the industry and from advice I received early on in my career, I discovered that there were far more people who wanted me to succeed than those that did not. I seek those people out.”

S’phelele Moshobane, 30

S’phelele Moshobane, 30

“I aspire to build leaders who will lead and mentor others. I also aspire to establish hubs where women and girl children will have access to resources and mentorship in business.”

Sue Hedden, 38

Sue Hedden, 38

“In standing together as a community, we are trying to effect change for the good of everyone. By keeping the most vulnerable groups, such as children and the elderly, at the centre of our hearts, we have been able to have a stronger and more powerful voice and have protected our community members.”

Thabile Makgala, 39

Thabile Makgala, 39

The mining sector was created by men, for men. We cannot change the industry and talk about diversity, equity and inclusion and exclude the men from the conversation.

Reneé Thompson, 43

Reneé Thompson, 43

Reneé Thompson’s inspiration lies in the strength and determination of women to build collectively for the benefit of themselves, their children and the greater community.

Minah Mkhavele, 35

Minah Mkhavele, 35

“We have to face the challenge head-on. Out of weeping comes wisdom.”

Nikki Brighton, 60

Nikki Brighton, 60

“I’m all for anything that builds community. Unless we have a strong community, we are not going to get anywhere with anything.”

Phinah Kodisang, 43

Phinah Kodisang, 43

“I want to see many more black women achieving greatness, not being apologetic for wanting more, wanting better and claiming positions and spaces — without the threat of violence hanging over their heads or discrimination putting them at a disadvantage.”

Refiloe Molefe, 61

Refiloe Molefe, 61

“If you want to see something good, start by doing it yourself so that you inspire the next person. That’s how we change the world.”

Nobukhosi Dlamini, 39

Nobukhosi Dlamini, 39

“There is no reason why women in our communities cannot be trained to access global careers. The educational resources are available, and our young people are definitely talented enough to access them.”

Portia Mavhungu, 33

Portia Mavhungu, 33

“There is no such thing as a stupid idea, and we should never let our fears and failures become our navigator of life. We are stronger than that.”

Siddika Osman, 43

Siddika Osman, 43

“Technology is a key enabler to propel Africa forward. If we can use technology to innovate, then we can reduce many of the struggles and inequalities we face.”

Sindiswa Mzamo, 49

Sindiswa Mzamo, 49

“I choose to challenge women to take their rightful positions in the marketplace, and lead with integrity and dignity.”

Thandeka Ndlovu-Mngomezulu, 38

Thandeka Ndlovu-Mngomezulu, 38

“Everybody starts from somewhere. We don’t all start from the same platform, but if you are serious you will get there.”

Mmabatho Makotanyane, 32

Mmabatho Makotanyane, 32

“There’s this notion that women are jealous of each other, but through our sessions we see women come together with the vision of empowering each other.”

Dr Lungi Nyathi, 40

Dr Lungi Nyathi, 40

“I want to play a more Pan-African role in the healthcare system of our continent in the future. South Africa has so much that can help other African countries accelerate their health system journeys. I have learnt a lot in my career thus far and I would like to use what I have to build the health systems in other countries.”

Mpho Motloung, 39

Mpho Motloung, 39

“Growing up, I was fed the wrong information about periods. I don’t want my daughter, or anyone, to have the same experience.”

“Giving period products to menstruators is just part of the solution; there is a lot of education that is needed as well.”

Buhle Madlala, 40

Buhle Madlala, 40

“I hope that one day women will get offered the same credentials and afforded the same opportunities as their male counterparts. Women athletes still get paid far less than men and are overlooked for sponsorship, which undermines their talent.”

Chantell Witten, 49

Chantell Witten, 49

Chantell Witten has been engaged in the field of food and nutrition for children for 25 years. She is a dietician with a PhD in nutrition and is currently a lecturer in the faculty of health sciences at the University of the Free State. Her passion lies in infant and young child food and nutrition, with a particular focus on the normalisation of breastfeeding.

Geralda Wildschutt, 52

Geralda Wildschutt, 52

Geralda Wildshutt has always wanted to work in the field of social change and knew early on she wanted to become a psychologist.

Danai Nhando, 38

Danai Nhando, 38

“I want to see more young women venture into areas that look very daunting, and to realise that they can take up these spaces and own them.”

Nthabiseng Moleko, 39

Nthabiseng Moleko, 39

“I would encourage us to find local, Africa-embedded solutions that consider the local context. All disciplines need us, and women are able to conceive new things that bring life. The generation of ideas for the current and future generations needs more innovators, diverse thinkers and disruptors.”

Fundiswa Ndlela, 35

Fundiswa Ndlela, 35

“My work in rural democracy and women’s rights inspires and heals me at the same time because it’s something I believe in.”

Jacqui Taylor, 56

Jacqui Taylor, 56

“I hope for our mental and emotional stability as a country that we can embrace more of this type of natural tourism.”

Lindiwe Matlali, 41

Lindiwe Matlali, 41

“Work hard and be so good that it’s impossible for people to ignore you.”

Lwethu Zwane, 33

Lwethu Zwane, 33

“I advise younger women to not shy away from ‘stretch’ opportunities. In fact, seek them out and do not be scared to fail. It’s how one learns and develops skills.”

Khanyisa Booi, 38

Khanyisa Booi, 38

“It was audacity that got me to start a magazine during a pandemic.”

Anela Mahamba, 31

Anela Mahamba, 31

“If we can create a generation of great ethical, accountable leaders we can build businesses that are responsible and value people more than profit and that look after people’s mental health.”

Daniela Bascelli, 44

Daniela Bascelli, 44

“I encourage and pursue a life of doing good and helping others where they cannot always help and support themselves in life’s different and very often tragic circumstances.”

Esha Mansingh, 35

Esha Mansingh, 35

Mansingh has shown how to use corporate power and influence to improve the lives of the women in her business, as well as in the broader community.

Flavia Senkubuge, 42

Flavia Senkubuge, 42

“There needs to be a realisation of our interconnectedness as people. Once we realise that ‘I am because we are’ — or ubuntu — it will become easier to advocate and implement many of the desires we have for the health system in South Africa and globally.”

Lebogang Mashigo, 35

Lebogang Mashigo, 35

“If you have disabled kids, don’t keep them at home; there are opportunities outside.”

Lerato Masemola, 41

Lerato Masemola, 41

“I love hanging around with 100-year-olds who give you life advice that’s pure and brutal.”

Dr Margaret Mojapelo, 62

Dr Margaret Mojapelo, 62

“In South Africa, we are specialists in mediocrity. You must look at best practices and evolve.”

Lusanda Ngesi, 41

Lusanda Ngesi, 41

“I am a strong believer that whatever you set your mind to is possible.”

Dr Abongile Qamata, 36

Dr Abongile Qamata, 36

“Young women and girls, you have so much potential that you need to exploit. Hard work and potential need to come together and, when they do, they make magic.”